Cape Range National Park Camping

Located adjacent to Ningaloo Marine Park, Cape Range National Park boasts spectacular rocky gorges carved by ancient rivers that adjoin one of the most pristine and beautiful coastlines in the world.

A highlight to any Cape Range experience is a trip to Yardie Creek, which flows between sheer cliffs. Guided boat tours are available for visitors to enjoy the tranquillity of the gorge and view the wildlife in its natural setting.

From the foot of the range, a narrow coastal plain extends to the magnificent beaches, waters and coral gardens of Ningaloo Marine Park. Turquoise Bay is made famous for its crystal clear waters, turquoise seas and white sandy beaches. Swimming and snorkelling sites can be accessed from the shore, however, strong currents mean inexperienced swimmers should be accompanied by an experienced swimmer or licenced tour operator.

Visitors can further explore the park’s rugged landscape of spectacular canyons along drive trails into Charles Knife Canyon and Shothole Canyon.

The Milyering Visitor Centre lies in the north of the park and is open every day except Christmas. It’s a great place to stop and find out more about the park and its attractions.

The eleven campgrounds along the Cape Range coast are in very high demand from April to October.

Check availability & book 

Cape Range offers walks through deep gorges such as Mandu Mandu and the Badjirrajirra Loop Trail across the scenic high country at Charles Knife Canyon.

Euros, wallabies, emus and perenties are regularly encountered and the threatened black-footed rock-wallaby can be frequently spotted on the cliffs at Yardie Creek Gorge, which you can also view from the Yardie Creek Boat Tour. The Mangrove Bay Bird Hide is a great place to see shorebirds, mangrove fantails, mangrove whistlers and yellow white eyes.

Temperatures can soar to over 50°C in summer. Walks should only be attempted between April and September. Wear suitable footwear and clothing and carry plenty of water. If taking an extended walk let someone know your expected time of return.

The access road through the park is sealed, with two-wheel-drive access to camp and day use sites. A four-wheel-drive is needed to cross Yardie Creek. Conditions change quickly with rain and access may become restricted.

Wildlife abounds in the park, so please drive with consideration and avoid driving at dusk, dawn and at night.

There is no better way to discover the beauty and diversity of Western Australia than to visit its world-class parks. Visitor fees apply at many of these parks and the money raised contributes to park management, protection of the environment and the development and maintenance of visitor services and facilities. Enjoy your visit knowing that your fees have made a valuable contribution.

What fees might you need to pay?

  • Park entry fees apply at a number of the most popular parks in Western Australia. If you buy a park pass you will enjoy unlimited park entry for the duration of the pass with no need to pay entry fees.
  • Camping fees apply in most campgrounds and vary by location and the level of facilities provided
  • There are a number of tours, experiences and facilities in parks throughout the state called attractions which have separate fees. See Attraction fees.
  • Fees which are not for entry, camping or attractions are listed together as other fees.

Holders of certain Australian issued cards and recipients of payments or allowances can benefit from Concession rate fees and passes. Organised group outings might be eligible for fee reductions or waivers on application. 

These fees apply only for recreational visits to parks. Permission is required to conduct commercial activities in parks and fees may apply.Downloads: 

Park visitor fees brochure current at 1 September 2018 (336.43kB)

Park visitor fees Questions and Answers September 2018 (197.76kB)

Visitor fees and charges from 1 September 2018 (190.75kB)

Hike through the rocky gorges of arid, rugged Cape Range in the Ningaloo Coast World Heritage Area, and camp beachside adjacent to the vibrant, colourful Ningaloo Marine Park.Essential information for all parks of Australia’s Coral CoastEssential information for all parks of Ningaloo Coast World Heritage Area

Sites & Activities

Phone: +61 (0)8 9949 2808Send Email

Open every day

50 km W of Exmouth

Located adjacent to Ningaloo Marine Park, Cape Range National Park boasts spectacular rocky gorges carved by ancient rivers that adjoin one of the most pristine and beautiful coastlines in the world.

A highlight to any Cape Range experience is a trip to Yardie Creek, which flows between sheer cliffs. Guided boat tours are available for visitors to enjoy the tranquillity of the gorge and view the wildlife in its natural setting.

From the foot of the range, a narrow coastal plain extends to the magnificent beaches, waters and coral gardens of Ningaloo Marine Park. Turquoise Bay is made famous for its crystal clear waters, turquoise seas and white sandy beaches. Swimming and snorkelling sites can be accessed from the shore, however, strong currents mean inexperienced swimmers should be accompanied by an experienced swimmer or licenced tour operator.

Visitors can further explore the park’s rugged landscape of spectacular canyons along drive trails into Charles Knife Canyon and Shothole Canyon.

The Milyering Visitor Centre lies in the north of the park and is open every day except Christmas. It’s a great place to stop and find out more about the park and its attractions.

The eleven campgrounds along the Cape Range coast are in very high demand from April to October.

Check availability & book 

Cape Range offers walks through deep gorges such as Mandu Mandu and the Badjirrajirra Loop Trail across the scenic high country at Charles Knife Canyon.

Euros, wallabies, emus and perenties are regularly encountered and the threatened black-footed rock-wallaby can be frequently spotted on the cliffs at Yardie Creek Gorge, which you can also view from the Yardie Creek Boat Tour. The Mangrove Bay Bird Hide is a great place to see shorebirds, mangrove fantails, mangrove whistlers and yellow white eyes.

Temperatures can soar to over 50°C in summer. Walks should only be attempted between April and September. Wear suitable footwear and clothing and carry plenty of water. If taking an extended walk let someone know your expected time of return.

The access road through the park is sealed, with two-wheel-drive access to camp and day use sites. A four-wheel-drive is needed to cross Yardie Creek. Conditions change quickly with rain and access may become restricted.

Wildlife abounds in the park, so please drive with consideration and avoid driving at dusk, dawn and at night.World Heritage listed

We recognise and acknowledge Baiyunga and Jinigudira people as the Traditional custodians of Cape Range National Park.

+Mandu Mandu Gorge

A 3km return trail that leads along the gorge rim then descends into the gorge so that you walk along the bottom back to the carpark.
Read More…South Mandu

South Mandu is a popular snorkelling spot. It is within a benthic protection zone so visitors can observe marine life in its natural state.
Read More…Pilgonoman Gorge

Listed as an historic ‘sheep holding’ area, Pilgonoman Gorge offers a short walk starting from the car park. Visitors can discover disused water troughs and fencing relics. 
Read More…Pilgramunna

Pilgramunna offers a scenic seaside experience and is a great place for snorkellers.
Read More…Lakeside Day Use Area

Lakeside is an ideal spot to explore by snorkel from the shore. There are numerous bombies of massive corals (Porites sp.) alongside a multitude of other coral species. 
Read More…Sandy Bay

Sandy Bay is a very picturesque beach popular for swimming and snorkelling.
Read More…Kurrajong Campground – Cape Range

Kurrajong is nestled between sand dunes and all sites are only a 150 metre walk from the beach. 
Read More…Milyering Well

The well is a historical site marked by an old water tank and remnants of fencing.
Read More…

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